Petworth / Pulborough Photographers

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Professional Photographers in Petworth and Lodsworth 

"A. B." - John Bray - Miss Coze - John Hoare - Walter Kevis - Albert James Malby - Frank Gaudrion Morgan - James Russell & Sons

 

"A. B." (1847-1848)

Proprietor of a daguerreotype studio in Chichester around 1847. "A. B." held a licence which covered Petworth and other small towns in West Sussex

ABOVE] An advertisement placed on the front page of The Times on 4th September 1848 by "A. B." , offering for sale a Daguerreotype Licence which covered the Sussex towns of Chichester, Bognor, Littlehampton, Arundel, Petworth and Midhurst. "A.B.", a bookseller and stationer, was previously based in Chichester, Sussex, but was residing in another county when this notice was published.

The initials "A. B." appeared at the foot of advertisements placed in the local and national press in 1847 and 1848, offering for sale a Daguerreotype licence which covered Chichester and the surrounding district, including the town of Petworth. An advertisement, also asking for interested parties to reply to "A. B.", was published in The Times on 4th September 1848 and included a few more details about the scope of the licence and added that a "glass room" (the photographic studio) was included in the sale. The identity of "A. B." has not been established. The newspaper notices provide a few clues - "A. B." was also a bookseller and stationer, was based in Chichester and around 1847 had established a photography business in another county. A possible candidate is Alfred Barber (1808-1884), who was a bookseller and stationer by trade, had purchased a daguerreotype licence from Richard Beard and set up a studio in Nottingham in October 1841, was active  in the southern counties of England from 1846 and established a daguerreotype studio in Southampton early in 1847.

John Henry BRAY (born 1863, Fulham, London)

Photographer active in LODSWORTH, near PETWORTH, during the Edwardian Period

[ABOVE ] The trade plate mark of John H. Bray of Lodsworth, Petworth, taken from the foot of  a cabinet portrait (c1900)

John Henry Bray was born in Fulham, London, in 1863 [ birth registered in the London district of Kensington during the 3rd Quarter of 1863). In his teens, John Henry Bray entered domestic service and at the time of the 1881 census he was working as a Footman to an Egypt-born member of the Stock Exchange named Emanuel Pinto.

In 1889, John Henry Bray married Mary Jane Hyland (born c1861, Maidstone, Kent), a dressmaker in her late twenties. [The marriage of John Henry Bray and Mary Jane Hyland was registered during the 4th Quarter of 1889 in Ticehurst, a district on the border of Kent and Sussex]. John Henry Bray found employment as a Butler in Lodsworth, a small West Sussex village between Midhurst and Petworth.

When the 1901 census was taken, John Henry Bray was still in domestic service in Lodsworth, West Sussex. On the census return, John Henry Bray is recorded as a "Butler - domestic", age 37. Around this time, John Henry Bray began taking photographic portraits in Lodsworth.  John Henry Bray is not listed as a professional photographer in the Sussex trade directories published between 1890 and 1915, but a single cabinet portrait of a young girl sitting on a fur-covered bench alongside a pet dog provides evidence that Bray was working as a photographer around 1905. The cabinet portrait carries an embossed trade plate mark which reads "J. H. Bray, LODSWORTH, PETWORTH".

[ABOVE] A cabinet portrait of a young girl with a pet dog photographed by John Henry Bray of Lodsworth, Petworth.

 
[LEFT] The entry for Lodsworth in Kelly's 1905 Directory of Sussex.

 

 

 Miss COZE  - Edith de la Coze (born 1881), Lydia de la Coze (born 1879), or Rosetta de la Coze (born 1874)

 Photographer in PETWORTH from 1908 until about 1910

At the time of the 1901 census, three daughters of the Easebourne photographer Francis de la Coze (c1847-1912) - Rosetta, Lydia and Edith - were earning their living by photography. One of the sisters, known as Miss Coze of Midhurst became a self-employed, professional photographer in Midhurst and the neighbouring town of Petworth. Any of the three sisters could have been the "Miss Coze" in question, yet, given her seniority, Miss Rosetta de la Coze seems the most likely candidate.

According to Peter Jerrome and Jonathan Newdick in their book "Petworth Time Out of Mind", on the retirement of Petworth's resident photographer Walter Kevis in 1908, a "Miss Coze of Midhurst" made visits to the market town to take portraits at Kevis's former studio in Lombard Street :

"Miss Coze of Midhurst was the formal successor to Kevis and in the years following his departure she came by appointment to the Lombard Street studio. After a while her visits became less regular and finally they ceased altogether. Photographs by her, whilst some are known, must be considered uncommon."

 "Petworth Time Out of Mind" by Peter Jerrome and Jonathan Newdick (1982)

[ABOVE] Cottages in Station Road, Petworth (1914). A rare photograph by Miss Coze of Midhurst and Petworth.

 

John HOARE (1827-1879)

Photographer active in PETWORTH around 1872

[ABOVE] A view of buildings in Market Square, Petworth,  photographed by John Hoare around 1872.

[ABOVE] Details of photographer John Hoare (1827-1879) as written in ink on the reverse of a carte-de-visite photograph produced in Petworth, Sussex, around 1871.

[ABOVE] The trade plate of the photographer John  Hoare when he was based in Farnham, Surrey, between 1864 and 1870.
John Hoare was born in the small West Sussex village of Sidlesham (3 miles south of Chichester) towards the end of 1827, the son of Mary and George Hoare, a blacksmith. [John Hoare was christened at Sidlesham on 8th December 1827]. By 1851, John Hoare, his parents and two younger siblings were living in the West Sussex coastal village of Bosham. On the 1851 census return, twenty-three year old John Hoare was recorded as a "Grocer" in Bosham.

When the 1861 census was taken, thirty-two year old John Hoare was still residing with his parents and two siblings in Bosham (a village 3 miles to the west of Chichester). On the census return, John Hoare's occupation is given as "formerly Grocer". Interestingly, Joseph Hoare (John's 29 year old brother) is described on the 1861 census return as a "Cabinet Maker & Photographer". This suggests that John Hoare could have been engaged in photography as early as 1861, Unfortunately, I do not know exactly when John Hoare arrived in Farnham, Surrey, to set up his photography business, but a date of between 1863 and 1867 is realistic.


On 31st October 1867, at Providence Chapel, Chichester, forty year old John Hoare married Elizabeth Ann Bide (born 1847, Farnham, Surrey), the twenty year old daughter of Elizabeth and Joseph Bide, a shoemaker of Farnham. The marriage certificate gives John Hoare's profession as "Photographer". The couple settled in Elizabeth's home town of Farnham, where their first child, Mary Ann Hoare, was born on 19th September 1868. Mary Ann's birth certificate shows that in 1868 John Hoare and his wife were living in West Street, Farnham and that John Hoare, Mary Ann's father, was still working as a photographer.

By the time John and Elizabeth Hoare's second child, Elizabeth Ruth Hoare, was born in 1870, John Hoare was operating as a photographer in the Hampshire market town of Fareham. The 1871 census records John and Elizabeth Hoare and their two young daughters residing in Fareham, Hampshire. On the 1871 census return, John Hoare is recorded as a "Photographer", aged 42. Around this time, John Hare paid a visit to Petworth in West Sussex. A carte-de-visite photograph by John Hoare, dating from around 1872, has a printed trade plate with the business address of "Fareham, Hants." crossed out and replaced by the hand-written inscription "Petworth, Sussex".

By the Spring of 1873, John Hoare and his family were back in Farnham, Surrey. John Hoare's third child, Esther Frances Hoare was born in Farnham during the 2nd Quarter of 1873. John and Elizabeth Hoare's fourth child, another daughter, was born in Farnham the following year. (The birth of Lydia Christiana Hoare was registered in the district of Farnham during the 2nd Quarter of 1875).

The Hoare family's fortunes declined in the late 1870s. Although he was now residing in the town of Farnham, John Hoare is not recorded as a photographer, or in any other trade or profession, in Kelly's Post Office Directory of Surrey published in 1878. By the beginning of 1879, John Hoare had entered the Farnham Union Workhouse. John Hoare died in the Farnham Workhouse on 27th February 1879 at the age of 50; his death certificate giving the cause of death as "Diabetes". The registrar noted on John Hoare's death certificate that the dead man had formerly worked as a "Photographer".

John Hoare's widow, Mrs Elizabeth Ann Hoare, and his four daughters were taken in by her uncle, Thomas Poulter, a seventy year old widowed labourer. The 1881 census records thirty-six year old Elizabeth Hoare and her four daughters Mary Ann (aged 11), Elizabeth Ruth (aged 9), Esther Fanny (aged 7) and Lydia Christiana Hoare (6) residing with Thomas Poulter at Beaver's Kiln, Farnham, Surrey. Mrs Elizabeth Hoare supported her children by dressmaking, but financial pressures eased when in 1891 she married Henry Reed (born 1832, Burley, Hampshire), a widowed gardener of Farnham. Two years later, Elizabeth was widowed again, when Henry Reed died at Cass Cottage, Farnham on 21st June 1893, at the age of sixty-two. The 1901 census shows Mrs Elizabeth Reed (Hoare), described as a  "Dressmaker - own business", aged 54, residing at 13 Castle Street, Farnham, with her three unmarried daughters Ruth Elizabeth (aged 29), Fanny Esther (aged 27) and Lydia Christiana Hoare (aged 25). [ Elizabeth's eldest daughter, Mary Ann Hoare, had married William Macklin in 1899]. All three unmarried daughters were employed as dressmakers by their widowed mother. Ruth Elizabeth Hoare was also a talented amateur artist, painting watercolours of scenes in her home town of Farnham.

 
John Hoare - Photographer in Farnham, Surrey

[ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of a woman wearing a decorated bonnet, photographed by John Hoare of Farnham, Surrey (c1864). This lady was apparently a member of the Clapshaw/ Ramscar /Penrose Families. The Clapshaws had strong links with Farnham. Charles Clapshaw, a cricket bat maker, once resided in Farnham. [ABOVE] The reverse of the carte-de-visite portrait by John Hoare of Farnham, illustrated on the left, showing Hoare's elaborate trade plate, incorporating a crown and four national flags. A printed message at the foot of the carte advised customers that "the negative being preserved any numbers of copies can be had".

PHOTO: Courtesy of Roger Little of Dublin

PHOTO: Courtesy of Roger Little of Dublin

 
John Hoare in Petworth

[ABOVE] A portrait of two musicians, photographed by John Hoare during his brief stay in Petworth, Sussex, around 1871. [ABOVE] The reverse of a carte-de-visite by John Hoare, showing the address of Fareham, Hampshire, crossed out and replaced by the hand-written inscription "Petworth, Sussex". [ABOVE] The reverse of a carte-de-visite by John Hoare,  inscribed in ink  "J. Hoare, Photo. Petworth, Sussex". (c1871)
   

Acknowledgements

 I am grateful to Simon Dawes for providing details of John Hoare's life and family on his genealogy website Simon T. Dawes Family Tree. Simon Dawes includes on his family history website photographs of Mrs Elizabeth Ann Hoare (John Hoare's widow) and John Hoare's daughters Mary Ann Hoare and Fanny Esther Hoare, together with other family photographs. Thanks to Roger Little of Dublin for providing the carte-de-visite by John Hoare of Farnham, Surrey.
 

Walter John  KEVIS  (1854-1924)      

Photographer in PETWORTH between 1877 and 1908

Walter John Kevis was born in London in 1854, the son of Harriet and James Kevis, a licensed victualler. After his marriage to Emma Earle in 1877, Walter Kevis established a photographic portrait studio in Lombard Street, Petworth.

Walter John Kevis described himself as a "Portrait & Landscape Photographer". Kevis produced carte-de-visite and cabinet portraits at his Lombard Street studio and photographed scenes around Petworth and the surrounding area. In the early 1900s, Kevis issued some of his photographic views as picture postcards.

Walter John Kevis worked as a photographer in Petworth for over thirty years, eventually retiring in 1908. Walter Kevis passed on his tobacconist business in Lombard Street to his nephew Herbert Earle. The photographic studio above the tobacconist's shop was hired out to another photographer for a number of years before closing for good.

Walter and Emma Kevis left Petworth and settled in Croydon, Surrey. In the 1911 census, Walter Kevis and his wife Emma are both recorded at an address in Croydon. Walter John Kevis died in Croydon, Surrey, during the 4th Quarter of 1924, aged 71.

After Herbert Earle, the proprietor of the tobacconist's shop  died in 1950, a local photographer named George Garland discovered thousands of Kevis's glass plate negatives in the abandoned studio. Of the approximately 5,000 negatives, around five hundred were photographic views of Petworth and the surrounding area.

 Many of the portrait negatives carry the names of the sitter and the date on which the photograph was taken.

For a more detailed account of the life and photographic career of Walter John Kevis  , click on the link below :

Walter John Kevis - Petworth Photographer

[ABOVE ] A portrait of Walter John Kevis (1854-1924) by John White of Littlehampton (1900). Walter  Kevis worked as a photographer and tobacconist in Petworth from 1877 until 1908. Kevis was Petworth's main photographer during the Victorian and Edwardian period.

Carte-de-visite portraits by Walter J. Kevis of Petworth

[ABOVE ] The trade plate of the photographer Walter Kevis who operated from a studio in Lombard Street, Petworth, as printed on the reverse of  carte-de-visite portrait (c1878). [ABOVE ] A carte-de-visite portrait of  an unknown woman by Walter J. Kevis, Portrait & Landscape Photographer of  Lombard Street, Petworth (c1878). [ABOVE ] A carte-de-visite portrait of  a young woman by Walter J. Kevis, Portrait & Landscape Photographer of  Lombard Street, Petworth (c1878).

[ABOVE ] A carte-de-visite portrait of two women wearing straw boaters, photographed by Walter J. Kevis of  Lombard Street, Petworth (c1889). [ABOVE ] The trade plate of the photographer Walter Kevis of  Lombard Street, Petworth, as printed on the reverse of  carte-de-visite portrait (c1890).

[ABOVE ] A carte-de-visite portrait of  a young woman, photographed by Walter J. Kevis of  Lombard Street, Petworth (c1892).

 

Cabinet portraits by Walter J. Kevis of Petworth

[ABOVE ] A cabinet portrait of two girls, photographed by Walter J. Kevis of  Lombard Street, Petworth (c1900). The reverse carries the inscription "With love to Aunt and Uncle from Pearl and Ruby" [ABOVE ] A cabinet portrait of a young woman, photographed by Walter J. Kevis of  Lombard Street, Petworth (c1905).
 
To read a more detailed account of Walter Kevis's life and career and to see more examples of the photographic portraits taken at his Lombard Street studio in Petworth studio, click on the link below :

Walter Kevis - Petworth Photographer

 

Albert James MALBY (born 1860, Shoreditch, London - died c1901)

Photographer in PETWORTH in 1882

Albert James Malby was born in Shoreditch, London in 1860, the second son of Jane and Walter Malby senior (1831 -1919), a London photographer. Walter Malby, who was born in Shoreditch, London, in 1831, had married Jane Monday (born 1835, North Nibley, Gloucestershire) in 1857. The couple's first son, Walter Noah Malby was born in Shoreditch, London, in 1858. Albert James Malby arrived two years later. Walter Noah Malby (1858 -1892), Walter Malby senior's eldest son, later became a professional artist and photographer in Chichester.

Between 1867 and 1871, Walter Malby senior operated a studio at 155 City Road, London. It is likely that Walter Malby senior worked as an itinerant photographer after he was declared bankrupt in 1874. and by the end of the decade he was in the Chichester area. At the time of the 1881 Census, Walter Malby senior, described by the enumerator as a 49 year old photographer, is shown living at a private house in Whyke Lane, Chichester, with his forty-five year old wife Jane Malby. By this date, his eldest son Walter Noah Malby had established his own photographic studio at 68 East Street, Chichester. Walter Noah Malby worked as a photographer in Chichester until his death in 1892 at the age of 34.

At the time of the 1881 census, Albert James Malby appears to be working as an itinerant photographer. The 1881 census return records Albert Malby as a twenty-one year old photographer boarding at the house of Mrs Harriet Baglin, a 50 year old widow, in Stroud Road, Gloucester. By 1882, Albert Malby was in West Sussex. Albert James Malby married Lizzie Wickenden (born c1858, Southborough, Kent) in the Sussex district of Westhampnett during the 3rd Quarter of 1882. Kelly's 1882 Directory of Sussex lists Albert James Malby as a photographer at "the back of East Street, Petworth". A cabinet portrait produced by Albert J. Malby around this time indicates that he had a photographic studio at Easebourne, near Midhurst and at Petworth. Albert Malby's stay in the Petworth area was relatively brief. By 1886, Albert Malby and his wife were in Leicestershire. C. N. Wright's Directory of Leicestershire, issued for the period 1887-1888, lists Bert Malby as an artist and photographer at 26 King Street, Leicester. During their stay in Leicester, Lizzie Malby gave birth to a son named Ralph Sidney Malby [ birth registered in Leicester during the 1st Quarter of 1886 ].

From Leicester, Albert Malby moved to Yorkshire, where he is recorded living with his wife and son at the time of the 1891 census. By 1900, Albert Malby and his family were in Manchester. Lizzie Malby gave birth to a baby girl named Charlotte at the beginning of 1901, but it appears that Albert James Malby died around this time. The 1901 census records Lizzie Malby, a forty-three year old widow, caring for Constance, a baby of three months, and living with her fifteen year old son Ralph at a house in South Manchester. Ralph Malby was supporting his mother by working as an assistant in a Manchester warehouse. Constance Malby, Ralph's baby sister, died soon after the 1901 census return was completed. Ralph Malby was to live for only another 12 years. Ralph Sidney Malby died in Yeovil, Somerset, in 1913, at the age 27.

[ABOVE ] A photograph of East Street, Petworth (c1878). Albert James Malby set up as a photographer  at "the back of East Street, Petworth" around 1882.

 

[ABOVE ] A cabinet portrait of a young child sitting on a swing, photographed by Albert James Malby of Midhurst and Petworth (1882).

[ABOVE ] The reverse of cabinet portrait produced by Albert James Malby indicating that  Albert Malby was operating two photographic studios in 1882, one at  Petworth, the other at Easebourne, near Midhurst (1882).

Frank Gaudrion MORGAN  (1820-1892)

 Photographer in PETWORTH

[ABOVE ] The trade plate design of Frank Gaudrion Morgan, "Chymist & Photographer" of Petworth, taken from  the reverse of a carte-de-visite portrait (c1865)
 

[ABOVE ] A portrait of a servant at Petworth House, probably photographed by Frank Gaudrion Morgan. This photograph was captioned "Phillips, for many years Lord Leconfield's coachman." This was one of many servant portraits collected together and captioned by Mrs Madeline Wyndham, the daughter-in-law of George Wyndham, 1st Baron Leconfield, the owner of Petworth House. (see further examples of these servant portraits on the right.
 

[ABOVE ] A photograph of wooden buildings on the edge of St Mary's Church, Petworth, near Bartons Lane, by Frank Gaudrion Morgan. In their book "Petworth Time Out of Mind", Peter Jerrome and Jonathan Newdick identify the building on the left as F. G. Morgan's photographic studio.

[ABOVE] A detail from a photograph of St Mary's churchyard by Frank Gaudrion Morgan, showing Morgan's wooden photographic studio on the left.

[ABOVE ] The trade plate of F. G. Morgan, "Chymist & Photographer" of Petworth, advertising the fact that Frank Gaudrion Morgan was "Under the Patronage of the Lords of the Committee of Privy Council on Education" at the "Science and Art Department, Kensington." This was a reference to the South Kensington Museum, which had been opened by Queen Victoria in 1857. Some 40 years later the museum was given the name of the Victoria & Albert Museum. Frank Gaudrion Morgan could have been commissioned by the South Kensington Museum to take photographs of exhibits or he might have made photographic portraits of some of the committee members.

Frank Gaudrion Morgan was born in Petworth in 1820, the son of George and Sophia Morgan. (Frank Gaudrion Morgan was baptised in Petworth on 7th July 1820). Frank's middle name of Gaudrion probably came from his mother Sophia, who was born in Petworth around 1801. ( A man named Francis Gaudrion married Ann Smart in Petworth in 1796). George Morgan, Frank's father, appears to have died before 1832. Pigot & Co.'s Sussex Directory for the period 1832-1834, lists Mrs Sophia Morgan, George Morgan's widow, as a shopkeeper and "straw hat maker". According to Pigot's Commercial Directory, Sophia Morgan was still working as a maker of straw hats in 1839.

Mrs Sophia Morgan died in Petworth in 1858 when she was in her late fifties. By this date, Frank Gaudrion Morgan was working as a chemist in Petworth's Church Street. The 1851 Post Office Directory of Sussex lists Frank G. Morgan as a "chemist & druggist" at Church Street, Petworth.

On 15th February 1860, Frank Gaudrion Morgan married Mary Challen (born 20th October 1828, Petworth), the daughter of Sarah and Benjamin Challen, a grocer and provision merchant of Golden Square, Petworth. The couple's only child, Mary Sophia Morgan, was born the following year. [The birth of Mary Sophia Morgan was registered in Petworth during the First Quarter of 1861].

Frank Gaudrion appears to have taken up photography around 1855. By the early 1860s, Frank Morgan was producing carte-de-visite portraits at a studio attached to his chemist's shop. Looking back to 1867, when she first came to Petworth, Lady Leconfield (Constance Evelyn Primrose) recollected that in the 1860s a number of houses surrounded the churchyard of St Mary's and "in one of these houses lived Morgan, the chemist, who also practised photography in a little glass studio close to the Bartons."

[ABOVE ] A view of Petworth House and Petworth Deer Park as depicted in a 19th Century engraving (c1835). Petworth House was the country seat of George Wyndham 1st Baron Leconfield (1787-1869).

Petworth House was the home of Henry Wyndham, Lord Leconfield, and the Wyndham family. After her marriage to Percy Scawen Wyndham (Lord Leconfield's brother) in 1860, Mrs Madeline Caroline Wyndham (c1837-1920) arranged for all the servants at Petworth to be photographed. The majority of the carte-de-visite portraits of Petworth's servants were taken by Frank Gaudrion Morgan.

Petworth House Servants photographed by Frank G. Morgan

Mrs Bragg, Lady Leconfield's maid

"All the dear Servants at Petworth, 1860" - Title Page

Mr Baubitt, the French cook

Mr Shepherd, Huntsman

Mr Dine, Butler at Petworth

Mr Smith, Bailiff

[ABOVE ] Photographic portraits of servants at Petworth House, collected and captioned by Mrs Madeline Caroline Wyndham, the wife of Mr Percy Scawen Wyndham, second son of  Lord Leconfield of Petworth. The above examples were taken at Frank Gaudrion Morgan's studio in Petworth around 1860. [Compare the furniture and matting with those featured in the cartes-de-visite, below]

In the 1881 census, Frank Gaudrion Morgan is recorded at his shop in Church Street, Petworth. Frank G. Morgan is described on the census return as a sixty year old "Chemyst & Druggist". By this date, Morgan appears to have abandoned photography, most of his surviving photographs dating from the 1860s and 1870s. A few years after the 1881 census, Frank Morgan sold his chemist business to Frederick George Edgar and retired to Brighton.

By 1891, Frank G. Morgan was living at 111 Preston Road, Brighton. Frank Gaudrion Morgan died early in 1892, at the age of 71. [ Frank Gaudrion Morgan's death was recorded in the Sussex district of Steyning during the First Quarter of 1892 ].

[ABOVE ] A photograph of Church Street, Petworth taken by Walter Kevis in the mid 1890s. The building on the left is the chemist shop belonging to George Steggles. This chemist shop was run by Frank Gaudrion Morgan from about 1851 until the mid 1880s. At the rear of the shop, Frank Gaudrion took photographic portraits "in a little glass studio". Morgan  sold his chemist business to Frederick George Edgar around 1885. When Frederick Edgar died in 1892 at the age of 34, the chemist's shop in Church Street passed to George Steggles (born 1855, Petworth).
 

1861 Census :Church Street, Petworth, Sussex

NAME

 

OCCUPATION

AGE

PLACE OF BIRTH

Frank Gaudrion MORGAN

Head

Chemist & Druggist

40

Petworth, Sussex

Mary MORGAN

Wife

 

32

Petworth, Sussex
Mary Sophia MORGAN

daughter

 

3 months

Petworth, Sussex

Kate CHALLEN

wife's sister  

20

Petworth, Sussex
Caroline ELCOMBE

servant

Domestic Servant

20

Petworth, Sussex

[ABOVE ]  Details of the household of Frank Gaudrion Morgan, Chemist and Druggist of Petworth, in the 1861 Census

 

[ABOVE ] A detail from an advertisement for "Morgan's Cordial Condition Powders" horse remedy prepared by Frank Gaudrion Morgan, Chemist and Druggist of Petworth (West Sussex Gazette, 23rd February 1864). Although Morgan had been taking photographs since the 1850s, the advertisement does not mention his photographic activities.

[ABOVE] A carte-de-visite photograph produced  by Frank Gaudrion Morgan of Petworth. The photograph could be a view of the grounds at Petworth House. [ABOVE] A carte-de-visite photograph of St Mary's churchyard in Petworth by Frank Gaudrion Morgan. The wooden structure on the left housed  Frank. G. Morgan's photographic studio.
 

Carte-de-visite portraits by Frank G. Morgan of Petworth

 

[ABOVE] A carte-de-visite studio portrait carrying on the reverse of the card  F. G. Morgan's trade plate and the inscription "Mr & Mrs Morgan & child". Could this be a group portrait of Frank Gaudrion Morgan, his wife Mary and their young daughter Mary Sophia Morgan (born 1861, Petworth) ? The cord matting and the turned wooden chair with the decorated back rest appear in the collection of servants portraits collected together and captioned by Mrs Madeline Wyndham, the daughter-in-law of George Wyndham, 1st Baron Leconfield, the owner of Petworth House.

[ABOVE ] The trade plate of Frank Gaudrion Morgan, "Chymist & Photographer" of Petworth (c1864)

[ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait by Frank Gaudrion Morgan  of Petworth, inscribed "Chas Harvey" (c1865)

[ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of a clergyman  by Frank Gaudrion Morgan  of Petworth (c1864)

[ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait by F. G. Morgan  inscribed "Thos Harvey in his 78th year". (c1867)

[ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait by Frank Gaudrion Morgan  of Petworth, inscribed "Mrs Chaplin" (c1867) [ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait by Frank Gaudrion Morgan  of Petworth, inscribed "Mrs Morris" (c1864) [ABOVE ] The trade plate of Frank Gaudrion Morgan, "Chymist & Photographer" of Petworth  (1868) [ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of an unknown woman by Frank Gaudrion Morgan  of Petworth (c1868)

[ABOVE] Members of the Bateman family of Petworth, a carte-de-visite by Frank G. Morgan (c1866) [ABOVE ] The reverse of a carte-de-visite by Frank G. Morgan, inscribed "Bateman, Petworth" (1866) [ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of a man with his pet dog by Frank Gaudrion Morgan  of Petworth (c1866) [ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of an unknown man by Frank Gaudrion Morgan  of Petworth (c1866)

[ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of a clergyman  by Frank Gaudrion Morgan  of Petworth (c1864) [ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of a clergyman  by Frank Gaudrion Morgan  of Petworth (c1867)

[ABOVE ] The trade plate of Frank Gaudrion Morgan, "Chymist & Photographer" of Petworth  (c1872)

[ABOVE ]  A carte-de-visite portrait of a seated man  by Frank Gaudrion Morgan  of Petworth (c1872)
 

James RUSSELL, & SONS

 Photographers in PETWORTH in the mid 1870s

James Russell, the founder of the Russell family of photographers, was born in West Wittering, Sussex, in 1809 and died in Chichester in 1899. James Russell established his photography business in Chichester in the 1850s. By the mid 1860s, James Russell had formed the firm of James Russell & Sons with his photographer sons.

During the 1870s, James Russell & Sons established branch studios in Worthing, Littlehampton, Bognor, and Petworth. The branch studio in Petworth was established around 1876. Chapman & Co.'s Almanack for the year 1877 included an advertisement for J. Russell & Sons which mentioned that a photographer from the firm was in "Attendance every Tuesday and Thursday at Petworth". However, the presence of James Russell & Sons in the town of Petworth was brief. After Walter Kevis established a photographic studio at his tobacconist's shop in Lombard Street in 1877, Russell & Sons twice weekly visits to Petworth ceased.

[RIGHT] The reverse of  a carte-de-visite produced  by James Russell & Sons around 1876.  The firm of  James Russell & Sons had its main studio in East Street, Chichester, but this carte from the Russell's studio in Littlehampton mentions other branches in Worthing, Bognor and Petworth. The medals on the design represents the award of "Honourable Mention" for photography given to James Russell at the International Exhibition of 1862

 

Acknowledgements

 "Petworth Time Out of Mind" by Peter Jerrome and Jonathan Newdick (The Window Press,1982) is essential reading for anyone studying the photographers of Petworth. Many of the details of the lives and careers of Frank Gaudrion Morgan and Walter John Kevis have been taken from Peter Jerrome and Jonathan Newdick's survey of Petworth photographers. The book "Country House Camera" by Christopher Simon Sykes (Weidenfeld & Nicolson,1980/ Pavilion Books 1987) includes a section on the servant portraits collected by Mrs Madeline Caroline Wyndham of Petworth House.

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