Bognor Photographers (A-G)

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Professional Photographers in Bognor (A-G)

"A. B." - William Ashton - Charles Austin - Austin & Son - William Barrett - Mrs Barrett - A. V. Chapman - Lionel Goodyer - William Guy

 

"A. B." (1847)

Holder of a daguerreotype licence which covered Bognor around 1847.

[ABOVE] A view of Bognor drawn and engraved in 1823 by the artist William Daniell (1769-1837)

[ABOVE] An advertisement placed on the front page of The Times on 4th September 1848 by "A. B." , offering for sale a Daguerreotype Licence which covered the Sussex towns of Chichester, Bognor, Littlehampton, Arundel, Petworth and Midhurst. "A.B.", a bookseller and stationer, was previously based in Chichester, Sussex, but was residing in another county when this notice was published.
The initials "A. B." appeared at the foot of advertisements placed in the local and national press in 1847 and 1848, offering for sale a Daguerreotype licence which covered Chichester and the surrounding district. The notice that appeared in the Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle on Saturday, 26th June 1847, reads as follows :
 

DAGUERREOTYPE

TO be SOLD, with or without a BOOKSELLING and STATIONERY BUSINESS, A LICENSE, embracing a circuit of fourteen miles, and including six towns. It has been granted for but a short time, and is parted with because the Proprietor has taken a larger business in another county.

Address, p.p. to A. B., Post Office Chichester.

A second advertisement, also asking for interested parties to reply to "A. B.", was published in The Times on 4th September 1848 and included a few more details about the scope of the licence and added that a "glass room" (the photographic studio) was included in the sale. The identity of "A. B." has not been established. The newspaper notices provide a few clues - "A. B." was also a bookseller and stationer, was based in Chichester and around 1847 had established a photography business in another county. A possible candidate is Alfred Barber (1808-1884), a bookseller and stationer by trade, who had purchased a daguerreotype licence from Richard Beard and set up a studio in Nottingham in October 1841. Alfred Barber was active  in the southern counties of England from 1846 and established a daguerreotype studio in Southampton early in 1847. The details of Alfred Barber's career suggests that he could have been the mysterious  "A. B." who was offering for sale a daguerreotype licence covering Chichester and Bognor because he had taken "a larger business in another county" (possibly in neighbouring Hampshire).

 

Alfred Barber (1808-1884) - the "A. B." of Chichester and Bognor ?

[ABOVE] A daguerreotype portrait of Alfred Barber (1808-1884), a printer, stationer and bookseller who established a daguerreotype studio in Nottingham in October 1841. After he was forced to close his Nottingham studio in 1843, Alfred Barber moved south and from 1846 he worked as a daguerreotype artist in the southern counties of England. Alfred Barber's initials and his documented photographic career suggests he might have been the "A. B." who was offering the daguerreotype licence covering six West Sussex towns (including Bognor) in 1847.

Alfred Barber was born in Nottingham on 19th March 1808, the son of Mary and Thomas Barber junior (1771-1843), a Nottinghamshire portrait painter. A printer, bookseller and stationer by trade, Alfred Barber married Eliza Gill, the daughter of John and Mary Gill,  on 23rd August 1831.

In 1841, Alfred Barber entered into negotiations with Richard Beard (1801-1885), a patent speculator who owned the patent rights to the daguerreotype process in England. Richard Beard had opened the first photographic portrait studio in the British Isles in London's Regent Street on 23rd March 1841 and from June 1841 he began to sell daguerreotype licences to those persons interested in establishing photographic portrait studios in the provinces. Richard Beard agreed to issue a daguerreotype licence to Alfred Barber to practise in Nottingham for the sum of 1,200 (pounds sterling). To operate in the city of Nottingham, Alfred Barber was expected to pay Beard a down payment of 450, a first instalment of 50, followed by three separate quarterly instalments of 240.

Alfred Barber opened his Photographic Portrait Institution in the attic rooms of Bromley House (which housed Nottingham's Subscription Library) on Saturday, 2nd October 1841. Unfortunately for Barber, around this time Nottingham was experiencing a recession in the lace and hosiery trades and therefore his photographic studio attracted only a small number of customers. Between 7th September 1842 and 10th January 1843, Alfred Barber only took 53 portraits. Barber struggled to keep up his payments to Richard Beard, who took legal action against the Nottinghamshire photographer, who was forced to close his photographic portrait studio in January 1843.

Alfred Barber travelled down to the Channel Islands, where Beard's patent restrictions did not apply. After a period working as a daguerreotype artist in St. Peter Port, Guernsey, and St. Helier in Jersey, from 1846 Alfred Barber operated in the southern counties of England. In 1846, Alfred Barber joined forces with John Frederick Goddard (1797-1866), who had been allowed by Beard to operate photographic portrait studios in Hampshire. By May 1846, Alfred Barber was taking daguerreotype portraits in Winchester and early in 1847, he and Goddard established a daguerreotype studio in Southampton. The details of Alfred Barber's career suggests that he could have been the mysterious "A. B." who was offering for sale a daguerreotype licence covering Chichester, Bognor and four other places in West Sussex because he had taken "a larger business in another county" (Alfred Barber operated a daguerreotype portrait studio in Winchester between 1846 and 1852). Alfred Barber eventually settled in Bristol, where he died on 8th March 1884, eleven days short of his 76th birthday.

 

Acknowledgements

I am indebted to Bernard & Pauline Heathcote for their impressive research into the lives and careers of early professional portrait photographers. Bernard & Pauline Heathcote's wonderful reference work, 'A FAITHFUL LIKENESS - The First Photographic Portrait Studios in the British Isles, 1841 to 1855' (2002) is an essential resource for anyone interested in the development of photographic portraiture. I have also drawn heavily from Bernard & Pauline Heathcote's booklet 'Pioneers of Photography in Nottinghamshire, 1841-1910'  (2001) for the account of Alfred Barber's life and photographic career. Other sources include R. Derek Wood's article 'The Daguerreotype in England: Some Primary Material Relating to Beard's Lawsuits' (History of Photography, October 1979) and contemporary newspapers [ The Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle (Saturday, 26th June 1847), The Times ( 4th September 1848) ]. I am grateful to Raymond Turley for first drawing my attention to A.B.'s 1847 advertisement in the Hampshire Telegraph.

 

William Thomas ASHTON (born 1870/1876, City of London)

William Thomas Ashton was born at Milton Street in the City of London either in 1870 or 1876.

In 1897, in the parish of St. Saviour, Southwark, William Thomas Ashton married Isabel Frances Mouque, the daughter of Isabelle Leybourne and Francis Augustus Mouque II, a lithographic artist. Isabel Frances Mouque had been born in South London on 20th October 1874 and was twenty-two years of age when she married the young photographer. (Interestingly, Isabel Frances Mouque's grandfather, Francois Auguste Mouque I (1791-1868), a fancy box manufacturer from Ostend in Belgium, worked as a photographic artist in London in the early 1850s. Together with his French business partner Louis Ferdinand Colas (c1820-1876), Francois Mouque established  a daguerreotype portrait gallery at their joint business premises in Cheapside, London in May 1849. Between 1849 and 1854, Mouque & Colas were listed as "pasteboard box manufacturers & Daguerreotype artists" at 105 Cheapside, London). On 13th October 1897, William Ashton's wife gave birth to a baby boy who was named William Joseph Ashton. [The birth of William Joseph Ashton was registered in the London district of Wandsworth during the 4th Quarter of 1897]. A second son, Leonard Alfred Ashton was born in the South London district of Putney on 1st June 1898.

When the 1901 census was taken, William Thomas Ashton was residing at 8 Pentlow Street, Putney, with his wife (Isabel) Frances Ashton (Mouque), who gives her place of birth as Kennington, London, and their two children, Leonard Ashton and his three year old brother William Ashton junior. On the census return William T. Ashton is described as a twenty-four year old "Photographer". Presumably, William Ashton was employed as a photographer in a local studio as he is not listed as a studio proprietor between 1897 and 1903. William Ashton and his family remained in Putney for a few years before moving down to the seaside resort of Bognor on the South Coast of Sussex.

William Ashton makes his first appearance as a photographer in Bognor in the pages of Kelly's Directory of Sussex of 1905. William Ashton is recorded as a photographer at 7 Steyne Street, Bognor from 1905 until around 1909. William T. Ashton's third son, Frank Hunter Ashton was born in Bognor on 22nd June 1909. By 1910, William Ashton is listed in local directories at 3 Highfield, South Bersted and from this date until 1918, he is entered in trade directories as a photographer at Highfield Road, Bognor. When the census was taken on 2nd April 1911, William Thomas Ashton was recorded with his wife and three sons at Ketura House, 3 Highfield Road, Bognor. William T. Ashton is described on the census return as a "Master Photographer". During their time in Bognor, William and (Isabel) Frances Ashton produced two more children - Frederick Thomas Ashton (born 6th April 1913) and Gladys Ashton, who was born during the 2nd Quarter of 1913, but sadly died the following year, shortly after her first birthday.

William Thomas Ashton died in Bognor during the 2nd Quarter of 1929. (William Ashton's age at death is given as 58, which suggests he was born around 1870 rather than 1876). William Ashton's wife Mrs Isabel Frances Ashton died on 17th February 1962, aged 87.

[ABOVE] William Ashton listed as a professional photographer at 7 Steyne Street, Bognor in the trades section of Kelly's Directory of Sussex, published in 1907.

[ABOVE] William Ashton listed as a professional photographer at Highfield Road, Bognor in the trades section of Kelly's Directory of Sussex, published in 1915.

 

 

 

 

 

Charles AUSTIN - AUSTIN & Co. - AUSTIN & Son

[ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of a lad in a cap photographed by C. Austin of Bognor. (c1902). At this time, Charles Austin was working as a "Solicitor's Clerk" in Bognor, but this small portrait suggests he was taking photographs in his spare time.

[ABOVE] The entry for Charles Albert Austin under the heading of "Private Residents" in the directory listing for Bognor in Kelly's 1905 Directory of Sussex. Although there is evidence that Charles Albert Austin worked as a photographer in Bognor from the early 1900s until about 1930. [BELOW] The entry for Charles Albert Austin in Kelly's Directory of Sussex published in 1915. Charles Austin's photography business "Austin & Son of Bognor" does not appear in the trade directories published during this period.

[ABOVE] The entry for Charles Albert Austin under the heading of "Private Residents" in the directory listing for Bognor in Kelly's 1915 Directory of Sussex.

 

 

A surviving carte-de-visite portrait indicates that a person named C. Austin was taking photographic portraits in Bognor in the early 1900s. The identity of the photographer C. Austin of Bognor has not been definitely established. However, a likely candidate is Charles Albert Austin (born c1869, Sall, Norfolk), who, at the time of the 1901 census, was living in Bognor, but is described by the census enumerator as a "Solicitor's Clerk", aged 32. Ten or so years later, "real photograph" postcards appear bearing the name of Austin & Son, Bognor. By this date, Charles Albert Austin's eldest son, Charles Herbert Douglas Austin (born 1891, Southsea, Hants.) was working as a professional photographer in Bognor. The firm of Charles Austin & Son printed and published a number of postcard views of Bognor and of places in the surrounding area (Bosham, Clymping, North Bersted, Walberton, etc ) in the period 1915 to 1919.

Charles Albert Austin was born in Sall, Norfolk during the 2nd Quarter of 1869, the son of Mary and Frederick Austin, a Norfolk farmer. Charles Austin's father, Frederick Austin, died in Sall in 1872, at the age of 39, and by 1881, twelve year old Charles and his elder brother George were boarders at St Peter's Collegiate School near Broadstairs in Kent. By 1888, Charles Albert Austin was in the Sussex seaside resort of Hastings, where, during the 4th Quarter of that year, he married Florence Jago, a school governess from Battersea. In subsequent census returns Florence declares that she was born in Battersea, S. W. London, around 1863, yet the registration of her birth, the 1881 census and the age given at her death in 1933, indicates that she was born 5 years earlier in 1858.

When the 1891 census was taken, Charles Austin and his wife Florence were residing in Hampshire at 22 Albert Road, Southsea. On the census return, Charles Austin is described as a "General Agent". At the time of the 1891 census, Charles Austin's wife Florence was pregnant and shortly afterwards gave birth to a son named Charles Herbert Douglas Austin. [The birth of Charles Douglas Austin was registered in the Hampshire district of Portsea during the 2nd Quarter of 1891].

Charles Austin's work took him from one place to another. When Charles and Florence Austin's second son, John Leslie Austin, was born during the 3rd Quarter of 1892, the family were in the Sussex seaside resort of Hastings, yet by the time their daughter Marjorie Austin was born during the 1st Quarter of 1894, they were living in Ramsgate, Kent.

By 1901, Charles Albert Austin and his family were living in the Sussex seaside resort of Bognor. The census, which was taken on 31st March 1901, recorded Charles Albert Austin, his wife Florence, and their three children at The Willows, Bersted Street, Bognor. Charles Albert Austin is described on the 1901 census return as a thirty-two year old "Solicitor's Clerk", yet there is evidence that he was taking photographs in Bognor on a semi-professional basis.

Around 1910, Charles Albert Austin and his eldest son  Charles Herbert Douglas Austin (born 1891, Southsea) began to publish "real photo" picture postcards under the name of Austin & Son of Bognor. By this time, Charles Albert Austin and his family had moved to a house named 'West View' in Upper Bognor Road, Bognor. The 1911 census records Charles Albert Austin and his family at  'West View', Upper Bognor Road, Bognor. Charles Albert Austin is described on the 1911 census return as a forty-two year old "Law Clerk", yet his nineteen year old son, Charles Herbert Douglas Austin gives his occupation as "Photographer".

The firm of Austin & Son continued to produce photographic views of villages in West Sussex until 1916. (Rendel Williams of the Sussex Postcards.Info website has unearthed picture postcards by Austin & Son of Bognor depicting the villages of   Bosham, Clymping, Pagham, Felpham, Boxgrove, Walberton, Westergate, Halnaker, Fishbourne, Slindon Woods, Singleton, Goodwood, Oving and East Lavant ).The partnership between Charles Albert Austin and his eldest son ended when Charles Herbert Douglas Austin died in Bognor towards the end of 1916, aged twenty-five. Charles Albert Austin possibly continued his photography business with the assistance of his younger son John Leslie Austin (born 1892, Hastings) as Rendel Williams has discovered that the firm of Austin & Son of Bognor provided two photographs for the Official Guide to Bognor, published in 1928.

 

 

[ABOVE] A photograph of a bearded man holding a dog at The Stamp House, North Bersted by Austin & Son of Bognor. The bearded man is presumably Richard Sharpe (born c1844, Boxgrove, Sussex), a grocer and former publican, who covered the inside of his house at North Bersted with postage stamps. The stamps were arranged in special designs and stuck on the walls, ceilings, and special screens inside the house and consequently Mr Sharpe's home became something of a tourist attraction.

Click on the link below to view a selection of 'real photo' picture postcards produced by Austin & Son of Bognor between 1910 and 1928 on Rendel Williams' excellent Sussex Postcards Info website:

 Postcards by Austin & Son of Bognor

   
William BARRETT and Mrs Catherine BARRETT - active as photographers in Bognor between 1861 and 1863

William Barrett (1829-1863)

Photographer active in Bognor from around 1861 to 1863

Mrs Catherine Barrett (born c1835, Leamington Priors, Warwickshire)

Photographer active in Bognor about 1863

William Barrett was born in Bradford, Yorkshire on 1st December 1829, the son of William Barrett senior and Mary Demaine, and was baptised a month later at Bradford's Baptist Chapel on 3rd January 1830. William Barrett junior became a travelling photographer in the north of England. From April to July 1855, William Barrett was taking photographic portraits in Parliament Street, York. In July 1855, Barrett moved on to Durham where he set up another temporary studio. After three months in Durham, Barrett travelled south towards Worcestershire. He had reached the city of Worcester by the Autumn of 1857. On 18th October 1857, William Barrett married Catherine Mary Smith (born 1835, Leamington Priors, Warwickshire) at St Peter's Church, Worcester. William Barrett continued his journey south, reaching Sussex around 1858.

William Barrett and his wife Catherine were in Chichester for the birth of their first child Kate, who arrived in 1858. [The birth of Kate Isabella Barrett was registered in Chichester during the 3rd Quarter of 1858]. A contemporary newspaper report mentions that "Mr. Wm. Barrett, the Photographist" was "well known in Chichester ". Barrett also took photographic portraits in nearby towns and in 1860 he was in Worthing with his family. William and Catherine Barrett's second child, Julia Florence Barrett, was born in Worthing on 5th September 1860. The following year, Barrett and his family settled in the nearby seaside resort of Bognor. At the time of the 1861 census, William Barrett, his wife Catherine and their two daughters, Kate and Julia, were living at a house in New Street, Bognor. William Barrett is entered on the census return as a "Photographer", aged 32. A third daughter, Edith Emily Barrett was born to William and Catherine Barrett in Bognor the following year. No longer constantly on the move, William Barrett was now able to arrange the christening of the two younger children, Julia and Edith, at the local church in South Bersted on 17th May 1862.

It appears that William Barrett had established a permanent photographic studio on the Parade at Bognor. However, Barrett was suffering from a fatal heart disease and on Monday, 2nd February 1863, he died from an "aneurism of the heart". There is evidence that, after William Barrett's death, his widow Mrs Catherine Barrett carried on the business at the Parade studio for a short time. (See the carte-de-visite portrait illustrated below).

[ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of a man  photographed by Mrs W. Barrett of the Parade, Bognor. (c1863). The photographer "Mrs W. Barrett" was Catherine Barrett, the widow of William Barrett.

[ABOVE] The death notice of the Bognor photographer William Barrett (1829-1863), published in the West Sussex Gazette on 5th February, 1863. William Barrett  worked as a photographic artist in Worthing and Chichester before settling in Bognor in 1861. After his death in February 1863, William Barrett's photographic portrait studio on The Parade, Bognor, was continued by his twenty-eight year old widow, Mrs Catherine Barrett.
 

William Barrett, Photographer of Bognor, Sussex

[ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of a unknown man  photographed by William Barrett of Bognor. (c1862). [ABOVE] The trade plate of William Barrett, photographer of Bognor. (c1862).

1861 Census: New Street, Bognor, Sussex

NAME

  AGE

OCCUPATION

PLACE OF BIRTH

William Barrett

Head

32

Photographer

Bradley, Yorkshire
Catherine M. Barrett wife 26   Warwick
Kate I. Barrett daughter 2   Chichester, Sussex
Julia F. Barrett daughter 7 months   Worthing, Sussex

[ABOVE] Details of the photographer William Barrett, his wife and children as recorded on the 1861 Census.

[ABOVE] View of South Bersted Church by Freeland & Son of Angmering Sussex  (c1870). William Barrett's two youngest daughters were christened in this church on 17th May, 1862.
 

Archie Vernon CHAPMAN  (born 1887, Ore, Sussex) - Photographer active in Bognor between 1910 and 1914

Archie Vernon Chapman was born in Ore, near Hastings, Sussex, during the 2nd Quarter of 1887. Archie Vernon Chapman was the son of Moonetta Louisa Jane Lickfold and William Chapman, a provisions merchant of Old London Road, Hastings. Archie's grandfather, George Lickfold (1843-1927) had been a professional photographer and between 1877 and 1879 he had operated photographic studios in the Norwood area of London.

Archie Vernon Chapman was living in Bognor by 1910, the year he married Olive Gladys Leigh. [The marriage of Archie V. Chapman and Olive G. Leigh was registered in the West Sussex district of Westhampnett during the 3rd Quarter of 1910]. Archie's bride Olive Gladys Leigh (born 1891, Isleworth, Middlesex) was the daughter of Emily and John Leigh, a "zinc & iron roofing contractor". Photographs were being produced in Bognor by Archie Chapman in 1910.

Archie Vernon Chapman is recorded as a photographer at The Arcade, Bognor, in Kelly's Directory of Sussex published in 1911. (Kelly's Directory of Sussex erroneously lists the proprietor as A. &. V. Chapman). The Arcade which ran from York Road to the High Street was constructed between 1901 and 1902 by local builder William Nathaniel Tate. A photography business called the Imperial Photo Co. was operating in the Arcade in 1909. Archie Vernon Chapman's studio was located at 7a Arcade.

When the 1911 census was taken, Archie Chapman and his young wife Olive were residing at 'Winton' in Gordon Avenue, Bognor. On the census return Archie Vernon Chapman is described as a portrait photographer, but most of his surviving photographs are photographic views in the popular postcard format. Rendel Williams of the Sussex Postcards.Info website reports that Archie Chapman produced "real photographic cards" of places in Emsworth, Nutbourne, Westbourne, Stansted Park, South Bersted and West Stoke. Rendel Williams notes that these picture postcards usually have the photographer's credit "Chapmans. Emsworth & Bognor"

By 1915, Archie Chapman's studio at No. 7 The Arcade had closed and the business premises had been acquired by a fruiterer named Stanley Stubbs.

[RIGHT] A portrait of  Maurice Farkoa (1864-1916), a popular musical comedy actor and singer, photographed around 1911 by Archie V. Chapman of Bognor.

Maurice Farkoa was born in Smyrna, Turkey in 1864, the son of a French father and an English mother. Maurice Farkoa received recognition as a singer when he appeared on the London stage in 1895. He appeared in the "Three Little Maids" at the Prince of Wales Theatre, a production which was taken to New York in 1904. .In 1911, Maurice Farkoa was residing in Kensington, London. Farkoa became a frequent visitor to New York. Early in 1916, Maurice Farkoa joined his cousin A. N. Fysher in New York to help launch an after-theatre restaurant. Maurice Farkoa died suddenly in New York on 21st March 1916, following an attack of apoplexy at his New York apartment.

[PHOTO: Private Collection]

[ABOVE] A view of The Arcade, Bognor photographed around 1907 and published as a picture postcard by L. Levy. The Arcade was constructed between 1901 and 1902 by local builder William Nathaniel Tate. This view shows the York Road entrance to The Arcade, flanked by The Library and Timothy White & Co.'s chemist shop at No. 1 The Arcade.

[ABOVE] The interior of The Arcade, Bognor photographed in 1905 and published as a picture postcard by J. Valentine. On the left is Albemarle House at No. 9 The Arcade, High Street, Bognor. [PHOTO: Courtesy of Rendel Williams and Sussex Postcards.Info]

 

The Arcade, Bognor

[ABOVE] A view of The Arcade, Bognor  published as a picture postcard in the Valentine's Series by Valentine Ltd. of Dundee. On the far left is the shop of Alfred E. Reynolds, hatter & hosier, The Arcade, High Street, Bognor (1915) [ABOVE] A detail from the Valentine's picture postcard of The Arcade, Bognor  illustrated on the left showing the entrance to The Arcade.
 
Rendel Williams has written an account of Archie Vernon Chapman's photographic career and features a number of real photo picture postcards published by A. V. Chapman on his excellent website Sussex Postcards.Info. You can view a selection of picture postcards produced by A. V. Chapman of Bognor & Emsworth by clicking on the link to Rendel Williams' Sussex Postcards.Info website below.

 Picture Postcards by A.V. Chapman of Bognor

 

Lionel GOODYER (born 1881, Beeston, Nottingham)

Lionel Riddick Goodyer was born in 1881 at his parent's home in Beeston, Nottinghamshire. [ The birth of Lionel Riddick Goodyer was registered in the Nottinghamshire district of Basford during the 4th Quarter of 1881 ]. Lionel was the only child of Caroline Helena Maltby (born c1859, Donegal, Ireland) and Charles Copeland Goodyer (born 1852, Camberwell, Surrey), a company accountant. Charles Copeland Goodyer had married Caroline Helena Maltby the previous year. [The marriage of Charles Goodyer and Caroline Maltby took place in Chesterfield, Derbyshire during the 3rd Quarter of 1880]. At the time of the 1881 census, Charles Goodyer and his pregnant wife were living in William Street, Beeston, Nottinghamshire. On the census return, twenty-eight year old Charles Goodyer gives his occupation as "Mercantile Clerk".

By 1891, Charles Goodyer and his family had moved to London, where Lionel was sent away to school. Ten years later the Goodyers were living in Hampstead in North London. The census taken on 31st March 1901 records company accountant Charles C. Goodyer living with his wife and son at 6 Canterbury Mansions, Hampstead. In 1901, nineteen year old Lionel Goodyer was living with his parents at their home in Hampstead and working as a "Photographer's Assistant".

On 8th October 1906, at the Church of St Peter, West Ham, East London, Lionel Goodyer married fellow photographic artist Florence May Westerdale, the second daughter of Mary Emma Phillips and the late Charles Elijah Westerdale (1856-1901), a mercantile clerk of Hackney, East London. Florence May Westerdale had been born in Hackney, London, in 1884 and at the time of the 1901 census she was living with her widowed mother Mrs Mary Westerdale (born c1850, Woolwich, Kent) and her elder sister Ethel Lilian Westerdale (born 1882, Hackney) at 8 Ferncliff Road, Downs Park Road, Dalston, Hackney. On the 1901 census return, Florence's occupation is given as "photographic assistant in spotting & retouching".

After his marriage to Florence in 1906, Lionel Goodyer settled in Bognor and took over the photographic studio of Campbell Sinclair at 33 High Street, Bognor. The 1911 census records Lionel and Florence Goodyer living at the site of their business at 33 High Street, Bognor. On the census return, twenty-nine year old Lionel Riddick Goodyer gives his occupation as "Photographer - Own Business", the census enumerator noting that Caroline, the photographer's wife was "assisting in the business". Lionel and Florence Goodyer's photography business at 33 High Street, Bognor went under the name of "The Goodyer Studio".

Lionel Goodyer and his wife operated the The Goodyer Studio at 33 High Street, Bognor until about 1912 when the business passed to Herbert Field

[ABOVE] A picture postcard entitled "Old Age Pensioners, Bognor" produced by Lionel Goodyer of Bognor in January 1909.  The Old Age Pensions Act was passed by Parliament in August 1908 and the first payments were made on 1st January 1909.  Goodyer has photographed a line of old men queuing outside Bognor's Post Office in York Road in January 1909. Neville Nisse has identified the two men in the doorway as  Edward Wood (born 1856, Ware, Herts.), Bognor's Postmaster, and his brother Thomas Wood (born 1860), who worked as a Post Office clerk.

[PHOTO: Courtesy of Rendel Williams and Sussex Postcards.Info]

[ABOVE] The trade plate of "The Goodyer Studio, 33 High Street, Bognor" as blind-stamped on postcard portrait produced by Bognor photographer Lionel Riddick Goodyer (c1910)

[ABOVE] A studio portrait of a girl and her young sibling, photographed by Lionel Riddick Goodyer at his studio at.33 High Street, Bognor (c1912). Lionel Goodyer specialised in child portraiture and his advertisements at the time described his premises in Bognor's High Street as "the studio for children".

[ABOVE] "The Goodyer Studio" pencilled in the bottom right-hand corner of the photograph of the two children pictured above.

 
Rendel Williams has written an account of Lionel Goodyer's photographic career and features a number of real photo picture postcards published by the Goodyer Studio of Bognor on his excellent website Sussex Postcards.Info. You can view a selection of picture postcards produced by Lionel Goodyer of Bognor by clicking on the link to Rendel Williams' Sussex Postcards.Info website below.

Picture Postcards by Lionel Riddick Goodyer of Bognor

 
William Henry GUY (born Chiddingly, Sussex)
William Henry Guy, who was active as a photographer in Bognor between 1904 and 1911, was born at Chiddingly, Sussex, during the 1st Quarter of 1882.

In 1903, William Henry Guy married Martha Wyatt (born 1879, Earnley, Sussex), the daughter of Emily and Frederick Wyatt, an agricultural labourer based in Sidlesham, West Sussex. [The marriage of William Henry Guy and Martha Wyatt was registered in the district of Westhampnett during the 4th Quarter of 1903]. The couple's first child, William Terry Guy, was born in Bognor during the 3rd Quarter of 1904. Two more sons followed - Frederick Leslie Guy (born 1908, Bognor) and Albert Guy (born 1910, Bognor). When the 1911 census was taken William Guy was recorded as a twenty-nine year old "Photographer" residing with his wife and three sons at a house in Ivy Lane, South Bersted, Bognor.

 

 

 

[RIGHT] A group of builders photographed at South Bersted by William Henry Guy (c1910)
 

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